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Alvan I Markle

PA, Bryn Mawr, 74 Pasture Ln, 19010

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hazleton.html - Penn State University
Jan 17, 2002 ... The estate, built by Alvan Markle Sr. in 1924 and known as "Highacres," ... In 1892, Alvan Markle expanded the family's holdings when he ...
Alvan Markle | LinkedIn
View Alvan Markle's professional profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the world's largest business network, helping professionals like Alvan Markle discover inside ...
Penn State Hazleton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The estate, built by Alvan Markle Sr., featured a 32-room fieldstone mansion with every modern convenience available at the time, as well as domestic staff ...
THE PLUMBING WORKS! - Stenton
Anne S. Lyons. Mr. and Mrs. Alvan Markle III. Mr. and Mrs. Alvan Markle IV. Gayla J. McCluskey. Mrs. William L. McLean III. Ellen Miller. Mrs. Michael D Milone ...
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THE PLUMBING WORKS! - Stenton
Anne S. Lyons. Mr. and Mrs. Alvan Markle III. Mr. and Mrs. Alvan Markle IV. Gayla J. McCluskey. Mrs. William L. McLean III. Ellen Miller. Mrs. Michael D Milone ...
the current newsletter. - Brinton 1704 House
University in May. Congratulations to all. Alvan and Frances Markle were good friends of Ted and Toni Brinton. Lillian and Lewis Pardee, a very successful CPA, ...
2009 Annual Report - Bartram's Garden
Mr. Alvan J. Markle, III. Mr. Tom McCarron and Mr. Richard Keiser. Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. McFarland. Mr. Michael Martin Mills and Mr. Randy Dalton. Mrs. Vicky ...
Web Quality Annual Report - The Athenaeum of Philadelphia
Mr. Alvan Markle, IV. Benjamin Martin, AIA. Gregory S. Maslow, M.D.. Mr. Charles E. Mather, III. Mrs. Robert Worrell Mather. Mr. David W. Maxey. Mr. Robert M.
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Prayer Vigil Held For Missing Woman
Dozens of friends and neighbors prayed for the safe return of 51-year-old Lisa Stone at a vigil held in her neighborhood in East Dallas. Lisa Stone was last seen by a neigbhor on June 4."She goes to a neighbor's house for dinner every night and on the 5th, she didn't show up, and so that's when they kind of started worrying," said Tammy Markle, who has been friends with Stone since the age of 5.Stone would post daily updates on Facebook -- her friends became concerned when Stone's posts stopped abruptly.A neighbor filed a missing person's report, but when police questioned Stone's partner of 15 years, who shares a home with her, found nothing out of the ordinary and called off the investigation.Weeks later, when a friend of Stone's began investigating on her own, she made an unnerving discovery."I went back to the trash dumpster and it just shocked me what I found; Lisa's birth certificate, all her pictures, her Bible, anything that was precious was in the trash dumpster and it broke my heart," said Joni Shannon, a long time friend of Stone's.She presented the evidence to police, who opened up another investigation.Investigators secured a search warrant when Stone's partner, Sherry Henry, did not let police inside the home. Authorities later seized 26 cats from the home."I don't know what to think. I don't want to speculate," Merkle said, "But what I can say is, there's just too many questions."Friends have posted signs and created a Facebook page hoping to spread the word about Stone's disappearance.Shannon said she won't give up the search for her friend until she has answers."You pray for the best, but we are fearing the worst now," Shannon said. "It's been too long, so we're praying that she will be found and justice will be served."
Select Jewelers
Select Jewelers is a family-owned business that has been serving Houston for over 13 years. We specialize in Bridal, Diamond and Custom jewelry of all kinds. Meet Select at the Bridal Extravaganza Show. Related posts:Coluccis Jewelers Summerville SC I Want a Rock Thomas Markle Jewelers Commercial Jewelers Woburn MA -Same Day Jewelry repair services.
Damn Nature U Breathtaking of the Day: Jesse Rosten says:...
Damn Nature U Breathtaking of the Day: Jesse Rosten says: I have a deep affection for the Redwood forests of Northern California. This is my best attempt to capture the reverence I feel when in the presence of these giants. Growing is Forever. Words by Kallie Markle. Music: Window - The Album Leaf. [dyt.]
Verragio
Verragio engagement rings available at Jones & Son Diamond & Bridal Fine Jewelry in Little Rock, Arkansas. Related posts:Tacori Engagement Rings Little Rock I Want a Rock Thomas Markle Jewelers Commercial
iPod Touch vs the Zune
Andy Markle explores the possibilities of whether or not you should buy the iPod touch or the Zune. He looks into both gadgets and explains to you that Apple definitely has the upper hand.
Comedy Exclusive! "MEN WHO SING" Ep 1: God
MEN WHO SING music on iTunes: http://itunes.com/MenWhoSing Steve Markle (Testees, Inside Steve's Mind) plays music therapist Steve Schwartz and his three twi...
Helping veterans get health records online even better
Okay, the deal is that the Department of Veterans Affairs makes vets' electronic health records available via a simple download, using their "blue button" application on myhealth.va.gov That's a big deal for vets, improving medical care, decreasing costs. (I'd sure like to have that available myself.) Next step involves people building applications making these records really easy to use by vets, in a way that includes new medical info safely. (Security and privacy is a big deal!) Turns out that the Markle Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Pioneer Portfolio just ran a contest where people proposed applications which do just that with the VA data. (I played a very minor role.) The winner is an Adobe application. Here's the deal as the Markle and VA folks say: The foundations sponsored the Blue Button Developer Challenge to stimulate innovation andencourage doctors, hospitals, pharmacies, insurers, and personal health information servicesto provide let their customers securely with a blue button to download their medical informationsecurely. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Medicare have led the way by preparing to offer a blue button on their password-protected online portals to give veterans and beneficiaries the option of downloading copies of their medical or claims information. The VA has already made the blue button available at its myhealth.va.gov site. Adobe demonstrated an application and a security-enabled PDF document for patients to storetheir downloads and share them with providers.  
Action Bob Markle
my blog where i pour out my heart and soul and even a bit of my spleen about the things that are important in my life...just like everyone, there's only one me...
Health Care 2.0 Challenge announces winners: focus on access to Practice Fusion
In the set of programming challenges announced by Health 2.0 a little over two months ago, Practice Fusion unveiled plans for the first open test of their API. In fact, according to Matthew Douglass, VP of Engineering of Practice Fusion, the Practice Fusion API challenge was one of the top challenges in the series, with over 30 participating teams. The Health 2.0 challenge was partly sponsored by O'Reilly Media and I covered it in href="http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/07/health-care-challenge-combines.html">blog last July. Practice Fusion is one of a growing number of software companies who attack the appalling lack of electronic medical systems in medicine by letting doctors log into an EMR online. In other words, this is EMR in the form of Software as a Service. One key enhancement that distinguishes Practice Fusion from its competition is an API they started to offer last summer. One could easily see why this would interest health care geeks and potential value-added resellers, but why would this be a competitive selling point to doctors? We will see in the course of this blog. The challenge and the response As I reported in my blog on the Health 2.0 challenge, Practice Fusion challenged developers not to code up a routine data exchange application, but to find a way to draw the patient into his own care--a beacon for progressive health care practitioners, who believe that patients hold the keys to their own health and need to be won over to treat themselves. Furthermore, Practice Fusion called for real-time data entry, which raises the reliability of what patients report and allow instant gratification. Developers responded with a plethora of applications with clear uses: An application that lets a user type in his current blood pressure, valuable for anyone with heart problems or other risks related to blood pressure A mood tracker mobile application that presents a list of possible words to describe a patient's mood, useful for people with affective disorders An app that lets a patient signal the doctor's office each time he or she takes a medication, useful to track compliance and prompt people who are disoriented or forgetful (especially useful because a side effect of many meds is to make you disoriented or forgetful) An app that hooks into a scale that can instantly transmit the weight registered, and sends the weight back to the doctor's office, which may well be useful for most of us living in America And the winner is... Health 2.0 can't be faulted for lacking a sense of fun, because one of the six winning applications was a hack in the style of href="http://makezine.com/">MAKE Magazine. Well, being fair, the submission consisted of two parts, one of which upheld the lofty and arcane software quest of interconnecting systems, while the other was a hack in the style of MAKE Magazine. I know which one you want to hear about, but I'll start with the interconnection project. Practice Fusion has a patient center called Patient Fusion to which patients can get accounts if their doctors use Practice Fusion. But many people prefer another site such as href="http://www.healthvault.com/">Microsoft HealthVault or href="http://www.google.com/health/">Google Health. Pete Gordon and his staff at Critical Systems wrote a .NET web application to sync data between Microsoft HealthVault and Patient Fusion. Anyone with accounts on those two systems will be able to login and synchronize data between the two PHRs at the application site. Authentication is through OAuth for Patient Fusion and OpenID can be used for HealthVault. Pete, and the Critical Systems team, will register the application as a full HealthVault production application by the end of the year; it is now using HealthVault test servers. But for those so inclined and unable to wait, they can download the source code and web application from the project's development web site on CodePlex and install the application on their own web server. Partly to test the connection and partly just to satisfy an itch Pete had ever since he started using HealthVault, they then went on to the hack: hooking up a low-budget body scale to a device that could transmit the patient's weight to a computer and on to HealthVault. Of course, sending your weight to the Internet is already possible with high-end scales, including BodyTrace eScale (another of the Health 2.0 challenge finalists) and Withings. But Pete liked the idea of providing this capability to people who don't want to purchase the premium scales. It's worth mentioning a bit about the winner's background here. Pete got his degree from Ohio State University in 1997 and was a Java and .NET developer for many years before happening upon a health care company in 2007. Deciding that more and more software jobs would require specialized domain knowledge, he decided to specialize in health care IT and started a new company two years ago in that field. Regardless of the motivation for his Escali monitor, the result is not something most heart patients will wire up on a weekend. Pete chose an Escali scale he bought for $45, which contains just barely enough electronics to pick up the information he wanted on a microprocessor. You can see the results in a video on the href="http://pfsync.codeplex.com">project's web site. Unable to get the weight directly from the scale's processor, Pete and his team reverse engineered the scale to figure out the format in which the processor sent information for display on the custom LCD, and to detect when the LCD was turned on. A serial port connection connects their processor to a PC. With this hack, Pete attracted the attention not only of the Health 2.0 team but of the Escali company, which is considering an upgrade that will incorporate the functionality into their scales through a more conventional combination of a Zigbee device and a low-power 802.15 wireless connection. In the set of programming challenges announced by Health 2.0 a little over two months ago, Practice Fusion unveiled plans for the first open test of their API. In fact, according to Matthew Douglass, VP of Engineering of Practice Fusion, their API challenge was one of the top challenges in the series, with over 30 teams working on submissions. Another finalist of note Practice Fusion's Patient Fusion API was also the platform for href="http://www.bodytrace.com/">BodyTrace, another of the Health 2.0 finalists. I talked to Gyula Borbely of BodyTrace about their app to feed user's weight into the system. BodyTrace created the world's first GSM-enabled bathroom scale. When the user steps on the scale, it sends out information instantly over T-Mobile's network to the BodyTrace web site. No Wi-Fi or Internet connection is needed, and therefore no technical knowledge or configuration. Users can view the course of their weight gain or loss through charts on the BodyTrace site, or sign up with their account information to have BodyTrace immediately forward the information to another service. BodyTrace already has data exchange set up with about ten other patient record sites, so adding Patient Fusion was fairly easy. Google Health and Microsoft HealthVault connections are underway. In addition to giving individuals the encouraging or cautionary data about their weight over time, BodyTrace is used by health care professionals, who prescribe the use of the eScale so they can see for themselves how well their treatment is working. One interesting red flag that the eScale can help with is a phenomenon that medical researchers have noticed: people with heart problems tend to suddenly gain weight in a way unrelated to their eating habits a few days before a heart attack. BodyTrace is trying to work out a research study with a major hospital to follow this lead and see what can be done to intervene with the patient before catastrophe strikes. It's interesting to note that BodyTrace talked to Practice Fusion for some time before a partnership before Practice Fusion release its API. At the beginning, it wasn't clear how they could work together. The release of the API made the relationship almost obvious. It provided all the technical answers to questions about merging their products. And as the next section shows, the API creates a business model for working together as well. Distribution and payment Getting an app out to users requires more than a nifty API; a search and download function has to be built into the service to actually distribute the apps. So Practice Fusion has added a function like the Facebook or Apple iPhone store, allowing doctors to download apps and then, in turn, prescribe them to patients. The doctor may say, for instance, "You've been acting a little more manic lately, so I want you to install this mood tracker and report your mood every day." The contract Practice Fusion signs with the people offering apps contains requirements for auditing to make sure the developer respects patient privacy and tests the app for quality. In addition, a rating service lets doctors indicate which apps they've found helpful. Apps have access only to data that they put into the system for that particular patient. Practice Fusion is a free service, supported by advertising. Although developers can charge for apps, Practice Fusion is encouraging them to offer the apps cost-free. One way to pay for development is to serve ads on the app, as iPhone developers now can do. So long as patient privacy is strictly respected, advertising may be a rich revenue source because the patient indicates the presence of something within a range of medical conditions merely by downloading the app. Other potential sources of payment include the sale of accompanying devices (such as a scale that transmits the patient's weight) and insurance companies who might see the real-time data feeds as a way to avoid more expensive interventions down the line. Real-time data from data living that can stave off crises and lower costs--that's a pretty good selling point or an API. So while creating an after-market for their service, Practice Fusion is harnessing creativity from the field to provide many more features than they could ever code up themselves, as well as interfaces to devices from other companies. Other challenge winners Six development teams won awards during the Health 2.0 challenge. Team Videntity won the award for href="http://health2challenge.org/blog/accelerating-wireless-health-adoption-through-a-standardized-social-network-platform/">Accelerating Wireless Health Adoption through a Standardized Social Network Platform, sponsored by West Wireless Health Institute. Team Videntity created a blood pressure meter meeting the challenge to integrate sensor-derived data with social networks to construct a personalized wireless health ecosystem. Team Pain Care @Ringful Health won the href="http://health2challenge.org/blog/team-pain-care-ringful-health/">Project HealthDesign Developer Challenge, sponsored by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Pioneer Portfolio and California HealthCare Foundation. The team developed a mobile app that allows people with chronic diseases such as diabetes href="http://www.projecthealthdesign.org/projects/overview-2006_2008/405516c">report and manage their conditions by sharing data with doctors and getting real-time advice. Team Acsys Healthcare won the award for href="http://health2challenge.org/blog/the-health-factor-%E2%80%93-using-the-county-health-rankings-to-make-smart-decisions/">Health Factor--Using the County Health Rankings to Make Smart Decisions, sponsored by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. The team built an augmented reality mobile application that displays Health Rankings information for the user's county based on a GPS reading. Team Happy Feet from Stanford University won the href="http://health2challenge.org/blog/move-your-app-developer-challenge/">Move Your App! Developer Challenge, sponsored by Catch and HopeLabs. The team created an app that encouraged people to walk, jog, run, cycle, or even ski, by providing inspiration through activity tracking, sharing statistics with friends, and earning achievement points. The winner of the href="http://health2challenge.org/blog/blue-button-challenge/">Blue Button Challenge, sponsored by Markle Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, will be announced on stage at the Health 2.0 Conference. The challenge asked teams to develop a web-based tool that uses sample data from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) or the VA to help patients stay healthy and manage their care.
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